Quantcast

Jewish Journal

JewishJournal.com

October 30, 2012

As storm descended on Northeast, Jews took to Internet to share stories and appeal for help

http://www.jewishjournal.com/nation/article/as_storm_descended_on_northeast_jews_took_to_internet_to_share_stories_and

Photos of storm damage, like this one from Astoria, Queens, were shared widely on Facebook and other websites. (Peter Romano via Creative Commons)

Photos of storm damage, like this one from Astoria, Queens, were shared widely on Facebook and other websites. (Peter Romano via Creative Commons)

Hurricane Sandy: How you can help

 

At 10 p.m. Oct. 29, as the full brunt of Hurricane Sandy was bearing down on the northeastern United States, filmmaker Sandi DuBowski posted an urgent online message.

DuBowski’s elderly parents had declined to leave their home in Manhattan Beach, a neighborhood in southern Brooklyn that sits on a small peninsula flanked by the Atlantic Ocean on one side and Sheepshead Bay on the other. The neighborhood is in Zone A, low-lying areas of New York City that Mayor Michael Bloomberg had ordered evacuated on Sunday afternoon in advance of the looming storm.

“The water has made it up to the first floor of the house,” DuBowski wrote. “They have gone up to the 2nd floor. Is there anyone who can rescue them and their neighbors tomorrow morning before the next high tide? I am scared how much higher it will go. Their power and phone is out.”

A flurry of messages followed, including contact information for relief organizations and city officials and simple words of prayer and encouragement. Friends reposted the appeal to their Facebook walls to increase its circulation.

“I’m so moved,” DuBowski said Tuesday, his voice betraying the strain of the night before. “Hundreds of people were forwarding this and searching for any avenue to help. It was a harrowing night.”

Finally, early Tuesday, DuBowski got a piece of good news. A neighbor with a cell phone had reached his mother, who had barely enough time to tell him she was all right before the phone went dead. DuBowski duly posted the update on Facebook.

“I know they’re alive,” he said in an interview. “I hope they’re OK. I think they’re OK.”

For many trapped in New York and other northeastern areas besieged by this week’s storm, social-media outlets — principally Facebook and Twitter — instantly transformed into lifelines, enabling residents to commiserate, appeal for help (or offer some) and share information, including pictures and video from the storm.

As the skies darkened Monday, video was posted showing the facade of a building in Manhattan being sheared off by the wind and of an explosion at a substation that knocked out power to most of lower Manhattan. Users linked to press conferences of the governors of New York and New Jersey, traded ideas for passing the time marooned at home in the dark, and even exchanged amusing doctored photos to lighten the mood. One showed the Statue of Liberty taking cover behind her pedestal as Sandy approached.

In the wake of the storm, Facebook emerged as a vital source of information in assessing damage. A photo of a tree breaking through the roof of the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center in Connecticut, posted Tuesday on Facebook, garnered a dozen comments in less than an hour, including a link to make a donation.

But the real energy occurred as the storm was unfolding late on Monday and continued even as the power losses began in earnest, with users switching to mobile phones to keep in touch. Often, their final messages were announcements that power had been cut and they were going mobile, enabling their friends to construct virtual maps of the cascading power outages.

“I could follow, ‘Oh, I know Ivan is on 34th and Ninth. OK, they’re down,’ ” said Alexis Frankel, who lives in an area of Queens that was relatively unscathed by the storm but spent hours posting dozens of storm updates. “You could follow the domino effect of how the storm was progressing, which I found particularly helpful.”

For some in less-affected areas, Facebook became a means to experience what less fortunate friends were living through. “Friends in Philly were closing laptops and asking, ‘Are we in the same place?’ said Ahava Zarembski, who lives in downtown Philadelphia and never lost electricity during the storm. “All of the excitement moved to the Web and what’s happening and totally not tapping into what’s happening outside.”

For a brief period, Facebook functioned in ways that critics claim it never does: bringing people together for actual in-person socializing. At Zarembski’s house, this resulted in a pre-hurricane lunch and dance party.

“That happened because I was posting online what I’m doing, which was basically cooking and baking and telling people to come over. And they did,” she said. “People were stuck and getting cooped up. There was this weird energy and excitement, where energy meets fear. People felt the need to be together.” 

JewishJournal.com is produced by TRIBE Media Corp., a non-profit media company whose mission is to inform, connect and enlighten community
through independent journalism. TRIBE Media produces the 150,000-reader print weekly Jewish Journal in Los Angeles – the largest Jewish print
weekly in the West – and the monthly glossy Tribe magazine (TribeJournal.com). Please support us by clicking here.

© Copyright 2014 Tribe Media Corp.
All rights reserved. JewishJournal.com is hosted by Nexcess.net
Web Design & Development by Hop Studios 0.2593 / 42