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April 21, 2005

A New Blend of Chick-Lit Sleuth

http://www.jewishjournal.com/arts/article/a_new_blend_of_chicklit_sleuth_20050422

Author Kyra Davis

Author Kyra Davis

 

"Sex, Murder and a Double Latte" (Red Dress Ink, $17.95)

Like her protagonist Sophie Katz, Kyra Davis has skin the color of a "well-brewed latte." That's why she has spent a large portion of her life fielding comments about her ethnicity.

There was her supervisor at a clothing store, for example, who asked about her Star of David necklace, since how could Davis be Jewish when she looks black? Or all the times people have assumed she's Puerto Rican and lecture her on taking pride in one's heritage when they discover she can't speak Spanish.

"Occasionally, when people ask me where I'm from, I'll make up some country in Africa and act really offended if they say they never heard of it," Davis said.

Growing up black and Jewish has paid off for the 32-year-old Davis, whose debut novel, "Sex, Murder and a Double Latte," manages to address issues of race and religion while blurring the lines between mystery and chick-lit fiction. "So many books with ethnic characters don't make it in the mainstream," said Davis, who will be reading at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, April 24. "But here, I've got this biracial protagonist and I'm thrilled that publishers are opening their minds. Of course, Sophie is both Jewish and black, so I guess she's doubled her market."

Davis, who signed a four-book deal with her publisher, joins a small-yet-growing group of new chick-lit authors like Laurie Gwen Shapiro ("The Matzo Ball Heiress") and Elise Abrams Miller ("Star Craving Mad"), who write about distinctly Jewish characters. Due out next month, Davis' novel stars mystery writer and frappuccino addict Sophie Katz, who's convinced that someone wants to kill her by re-enacting scenes from one of her books. To complicate matters, she's dating one of her murder suspects -- a dashing Russian Israeli who likes making l'chaim toasts in bars. And, of course, Sophie's mother piles on plenty of Jewish guilt as her daughter plays sleuth. "What is this, you're discovering bodies now? Why can't you live a nice, normal life like your sister?"

Margaret Marbury, executive editor of MIRA Books and Red Dress Ink, says she had been searching for the "perfect chick-lit mystery but most I saw either had too much mystery and too little girl stuff or vice versa. Kyra's book has the perfect balance."

Marbury, who rejects most of the hundreds of manuscripts she reads every year, adds that she's "really picky about female protagonists. But the major draw of Kyra's book was her main character, Sophie. She's real, multidimensional, sympathetic and incredibly funny."

In a telephone interview from her San Francisco home, Davis, gregarious and effusive, describes a rags-to-riches saga that bears some striking similarities to J.K. Rowling of "Harry Potter" fame. Like Rowling, Davis was a single mother with a precarious financial situation when she began writing her novel.

"My life was falling apart and I wanted to get lost in a fictional world," she says.

Born to a black father and a Jewish mother, Davis primarily grew up in Santa Cruz. Raised by her mother and maternal grandparents, "we were a High Holidays kind of family," she says. "But I've always felt at home in the Jewish community."

Though her grandmother always thought that her granddaughter should be a writer, Davis originally wanted to be an actress. After graduating high school, she opted to pursue fashion marketing and merchandising and spent some time in New York before returning to San Francisco to study business and humanities at Golden Gate University. She married, had a son and found a job as a marketing manager of an upscale sports club.

In 2001, Davis filed for divorce and felt her life had "become a Woody Allen joke. I had all these plans and none of them worked out," she says. "I was a single mother afraid of losing the house my grandfather built."

When Davis began to write, she knew she wanted to create "escapist fiction" but considering her state of affairs, "definitely not romance. I had all this anxiety and that lent itself to writing a murder mystery," she says. "Just take all your pent-up stuff and kill people off on the page."

Davis consulted a few books on fiction writing, worked during her lunch hours and late at night and after two years of labor, had a completed manuscript. Her mother covered the expense for a writing conference and Davis traveled there to pitch her book. Davis soon found an agent who swiftly secured a deal at Red Dress Ink.

"It's an American dream story," Davis says. "But it never would have happened if I hadn't gone through all these challenges. Let's face it, I wouldn't have written this manuscript if my life was going well."

Now that she no longer needs a day job, Davis plans to write two novels a year and stay home with her 5-year-old son Isaac.

While she of course hopes that her books will be successful, more importantly "this whole experience has taught me that I have the strength and ability to get through some really bad stuff," she says. "I can pursue my passions and dreams and demonstrate it for my son so that one day, he can do it, too."

Kyra Davis will be at Borders-Brentano's booth No. 201 on Sunday, April 24, at noon, at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. For more information, visit www.kyradavis.com or www.latimes.com/extras/festivalofbooks/.

 

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