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JewishJournal.com

July 16, 2008

A Mensh on the radiowaves to recovery

http://www.jewishjournal.com/music/article/a_mensh_on_the_radiowaves_to_recovery_20080716

One afternoon in 1989, Ricky Leigh Mensh hid out in his car in a parking garage in Bethesda, Md., paranoid after a five-day cocaine and booze spree.

"I had experienced so many consequences as a result of my addictions," Mensh, now 48 -- and 19 years sober -- said as he prepared to debut his syndicated "Recovery Radio Live" program on KLSX 97.1 Free FM this week. "I had been in and out of jail, broken bones while drunk, broken my nose several times in bar fights -- even had developed gout. I had become so paranoid after 13 years of using that I would lock myself in my townhouse and not come out for days."

Mensh had not slept for five days on that afternoon in 1989 when he realized he was "a cadaver waiting to happen" and phoned his grandmother from a pay phone for help. Forty-eight hours after that "moment of clarity," he said, he checked into a rehabilitation center and has been sober since.

He went on to become a prominent music industry executive and a voting member of the Grammy Awards -- and now he is hoping to offer addicts moments of clarity similar to his own with his "Recovery" program, which premiered locally this week and will continue to air Saturdays from 11 p.m. to midnight on KLSX.

"The show is designed to feel like a 12-step recovery meeting on the air," Mensh said from his home base in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. "Our primary goal is to reach out to those who are still [using], as well as to people in recovery, their friends, families and co-workers."

Mensh acts as the show's brash, charismatic host and says he studied past and present recovery shows while developing his unique format. His polished but personable program includes interviews with medical experts, such as Dr. Drew Pinsky ("Celebrity Rehab"); celebrity recovering addicts like bassist Nikki Sixx of Motley Crue; drug-related comedy bits; music inspired by addiction and treatment (think Aerosmith's "What It Takes"); conference-calling listeners to share stories; and scholarship giveaways to the C.A.R.E. 30-day treatment program in North Palm Beach, Fla. (the regular price tag: $22,000).

Pinsky has lauded the show as "the embodiment of recovery" and as a powerful example of the way the media can be used to transmit the message of recovery.

On the air, Mensh often shares parts of his own story, which began as he grew up in and around Washington, D.C., attending his maternal grandparents' Orthodox synagogue.

"But unfortunately, my mother married not one but two violent men," he said of his father and former stepfather; beatings and severe emotional abuse were de rigueur. Two days after Mensh graduated high school, he found his suitcase packed in the living room along with a note that read, "Get the f— out."

He fled to the efficiency apartment he had already rented for the summer and was showering the next morning when a roommate offered him a lit bong through the shower curtain.

"I took my first hit, and it filled the black hole inside of me that all addicts feel," he recalled. "It set me free from all my anger, and made me feel more comfortable in my own skin."

Over the next 13 years, Mensh snorted cocaine (sometimes off the turntables at his disc jockey gigs), added acid and Quaaludes to the mix, and imbibed to the point that he blacked out, only to awaken in a ditch or a stranger's car or bed. Although he managed to hold down radio jobs and even to found several profitable businesses during those years, his disease eventually spiraled out of control. In 1989, Mensh's therapist, who had also treated John Belushi, told him that the only difference between Mensh and the late comedian was that Belushi "was dead, and you aren't yet."

His first day of sobriety was March 25, 1989.

Cut to August 2007, when Mensh -- who by then had been voted one of the 30 most influential people in music by Source magazine -- was mortified by a tabloid TV show about celebrity addicts such as Britney Spears.

"The shows were ridiculing these people, whom I see as sick, as fodder for their revenue," he recalled. He also perceived that stars like Spears were using (or encouraged to use) "recovery" as a way to gain publicity for their latest albums or films.

"The tabloid media was bastardizing our beloved 12-step programs, and I wanted to do something to portray them in a positive light," he said.

The result was "Recovery Radio," which got its start on a Palm Beach station and is now in multiple markets. The show is expanding to include other kinds of addictions (on Super Bowl Sunday, the topic was gambling, for example). And plans are in the works to do live shows from Los Angeles -- such as broadcasting from a 12-step meeting in a federal prison -- and in other cities.

"As a Jew, it's important to me to reach out to other Jews," Mensh said. He cites the perception within the Jewish community that Jews don't tend to be addicts, which "made me feel like even more of a schmuck while I was in rehab. There's also the idea that Jews are too smart to abuse drugs and alcohol, which is part of the B.S. I told myself to keep me in denial while I was using."

"We want to reach out to people who are still sick and suffering, whomever they may be," he added.

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