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Jewish Journal

You Are What You Eat

by Howard Nemetz

January 6, 2005 | 7:00 pm

 

I am a vegetarian. I know there was a big controversy brewing over kosher meat, but I'm not sure what the Jewish position

on vegetarianism is. I suppose as long as the vegetables are pulled from the ground in a quick and humane manner, no one can object too strenuously to it. I know God created animals, but I can't imagine He'd be offended if I didn't eat them. I'd hate to think of God pouting in His room saying, between sobs, "I worked so hard on that lamb and Nemetz doesn't even touch it!"

People usually become vegetarians for either health concerns or humane reasons. It is, in theory, healthier to eat lower down on the food chain. Foods are more easily digestible (with the notable exception of my mother's potato kugel, some of which has been lodged in my small intestine since the Thursday before my bar mitzvah). The problem with doing anything for health reasons is that you're just staving off the inevitable -- like carrying an umbrella in a meteor shower. It may slow the meteor down a tad, but not enough to change your ultimate destiny.

As for the inhumanity of eating animals, while I applaud the sentiment, I think it is a somewhat misplaced compassion -- like the anti-abortionists who value the fetus but have no problem killing the abortion doctor. All one needs do is turn on the National Geographic channel to see that, out in the wild, fast eats slow and big eats little -- although for some unknown reason, nothing eats the guy holding the camera. If I ever go on safari, I'm renting a Betacam.

I have chosen to eschew meat for a third, more self-obsessed reason -- it's annoying to those around me. You know how some people say that they don't want to be a bother? Not me. I love being a bother. It really puts people out when they want -- or feel obligated to -- have me over for dinner (I'll accept either; a meal's a meal).

Upon learning of my restrictive diet, the host or hostess will invariably ask me the same question, "Do you eat fish?" Now I'm not a biologist (although I was a genetics major my first year in college -- until my grades came out, at which point the university and I agreed that I should pursue a degree in English), but it seems to me that fish hardly qualify as a vegetable. They're living things. Granted they don't have much of a life, but then neither did my Uncle Alec. In fact, he would have loved nothing more than to swim around in circles all day, hiding in fake rocks. He wasn't what you'd call an overachiever -- or even an achiever.

Now, as vegetarians go, I'm not that difficult to please. Aside from a major food group, I will eat pretty much anything. There is another, stricter level of vegetarianism. They are called vegans and they consume no animal products whatsoever. There is even a small sect of vegans -- I don't like to use the word fanatical because fanatics tend to get, well, fanatical when you use that word (go figure) -- who are so concerned with not taking any life whatsoever that they walk down the street with brooms, sweeping ants out of their paths lest they crush the poor vermin and take a life. The fact that they sweep the critters onto the road into oncoming traffic seems lost on these well-meaning souls. It is this line of flawed thinking that gave us the leaf blower -- it doesn't eliminate the leaf but it does blow it onto your neighbor's property where it's no longer your problem.

I find, however, that while familiarity usually breeds contempt, in my case it breeds indifference. The more often I go to someone's house for dinner, the less effect I have on his or her diet. At first, everyone eats a vegetarian meal because of me. After a while, the host makes a vegetarian meal with a dish for others to eat. Finally, I'm invited to a meat meal with a dish that I can eat. I can see the writing on the wall. Next I'll be asked to eat something before I come over. Well, I'm not going to wait for that to happen. I'm going to get new friends. That's why I'm asking you out there to invite me to dinner. I'm willing to go as far as Calabasas. Just remember, I don't eat fish.

Howard Nemetz is almost as good looking as his picture.

 

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