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Jewish Journal

Thrown For A Loop

by Avi Liberman

July 19, 2006 | 8:00 pm

"Avi we're doing some looping for a movie called, 'The Mount of Olives.' It was filmed in Israel and we're looking for Hebrew and Arabic speakers." Being an actor and comic in Los Angeles, you run into some interesting gigs. When my friend, Joey, himself a Christian Arab from Lebanon, called me about this one, I couldn't resist.

Looping is plugging in background sound for movies after they are shot so they sound more realistic. I had done some looping sessions before, but they were all in English. While this movie was also in English, there were plenty of scenes with Hebrew and Arabic in them. My Hebrew is far from perfect, but I can still pull off the Israeli accent so I was pretty sure I could do the job.

I got to the soundstage early in the morning, and the first person I met was a really nice guy named Sayid from Egypt. He was an accomplished actor, and I even recognized him from the movie, "The Insider," with Al Pacino.

As everyone else arrived for the looping and we filled out paperwork, we began schmoozing a little. (I'm guessing the Arabs would use a different word to describe it.) There were people from Egypt, Sudan, a really sweet girl from Iraq, a Druze from Lebanon whose family lived in Haifa, and four other Israelis beside me. There were Christians, Muslims, and Jews with all different levels of religious observance. I myself had to leave a little early because the session was on Friday, as I observe Shabbat.

The first few scenes were harmless enough -- we covered small background conversations, mostly in Hebrew. I immediately noticed that while we were all very friendly with one another, when it came to where we all sat, all the Israelis were on one side, and the Arabs on another. I didn't read too much into it and figured it was just out of convenience as most scenes were in either one language or another.

"OK guys, I need all five Hebrew speakers. This is right after a bus bombing, and I need as much sound as possible. You'll notice paramedics, victims, etc." All five of us approached the microphone. We watched the scene with no sound and it was pretty gory. There was blood everywhere. We each decided who we would cover on the screen and got started. When the cue came, we all immediately started screaming our parts. You heard shouts in Hebrew of "My leg, my leg!" "I'm bleeding help me!" "Where's my father!" "Out of the way, move, move!"

The one Hebrew-speaking woman was doing a great job crying in agony. When the sound cue was over we all stopped, and Joey chimed in, "I don't know what you guys were saying but ... man. Really intense guys."

I looked over toward the Arab speakers, and I noticed them all staring back and forth at each other. The Iraqi girl named Yasmin Hannaney, who couldn't have been nicer, finally just looked at us all and said, "Wow guys."

I could tell they were affected by it, but oddly enough we sort of weren't. It just seemed like we were almost too used to seeing it.

Shortly after there was a scene at a gravesite where Kaddish was being said. Two women displayed prominently in the shot were answering "amen," and they needed to be dubbed. The only two female voices we had were Yasmin and the other Israeli woman. Yasmin smiled as she asked us, "How do I say it, aymen or amen?" As we told her the right way she just smiled and thanked us.

The next few scenes shifted to shots of Palestinians at various rallies, and Joey asked if he could get as many guys up as possible: "OK guys, we need a lot of volume to cover the chanting. Sayid, why don't you lead."

I suddenly found myself, along with all the other Israeli men, chanting "Allah Akbar," and various other chants about God's glory in Arabic. I couldn't help but grin as I was doing it. Here I was, an Israeli-born Jew raised in a hugely Zionistic family, chanting at a Palestinian rally. I'd even spent the last three years leading a group of comics to Israel to perform to help support the state. I was at least hoping I would get a good joke out of all of this.

I'm not sure how I would have felt had I had to do some scenes where the chants were "Death to Israel" or something similar. Luckily it never came up. The time just seemed to fly by. Before I knew it I had to leave, and Joey told me it was fine. He completely understood, as opposed to most Jews I deal with in Hollywood who seem to always give me problems over my observance.

I felt badly that I had to sneak out so quickly, not having said goodbye to everyone, but I've kept in contact with some of the people from the session. Yasmin and I have e-mailed back and forth, and she's started an organization dealing with making films in the Middle East.

I was honored when she asked me if I wanted to be involved and immediately accepted. I invited her and some of the other guys to some of my upcoming shows.

It seems ironic that if you want to make a movie about Arabs and Jews fighting with each other, the only way you can make it work is if you have them getting along.

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