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Jewish Journal

Tom Teicholz

  • The Shout! Factory releases “The Marx Brothers TV Collection”

    August 6, 2014 | 11:14 am

    The Shout! Factory release of “The Marx Brothers TV Collection,” an omnibus of the Brothers Marx’s post-film career TV appearances, is occasion enough to celebrate once more the irrepressible talents of Groucho, Chico and Harpo Marx. 

    I suppose there may be some readers who have...

  • “Hollywood Exiles in Europe” film series at the Hammer Museum

    July 30, 2014 | 11:24 am

    Stories of the Hollywood blacklist of the 1940s and ’50s are, by now, well known. Many books, articles and documentaries exist about the lives of actors, screenwriters and directors who the studios deemed unemployable because of their association — real or alleged — with the...

  • Israeli artists, Orit Raff and Nir Evron, at LAXART

    July 30, 2014 | 11:10 am

    Art — both making it and enjoying it — seems a luxury in times of war. Yet the work of two Israeli artists, Orit Raff and Nir Evron, showing at the contemporary art space LAXART through Aug. 23, is not only a worthy distraction from the psychic weight of current events but also a...

  • Shedding light on World War II’s Red Army Soviet Jews

    June 11, 2014 | 9:48 am

    At the University of Southern California (USC), in the lobby of the Doheny Library, a giant story of Jewish history has been writ large in a small exhibition titled “Lives of the Great Patriotic War: The Untold Story of Soviet Jewish Soldiers in the Red Army during WWII.” On...

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  • Art that’s happenin’ in L.A. at the Hammer

    May 28, 2014 | 1:19 pm

    In keeping with summer being the season for superhero sequels, the Hammer Museum is presenting “Made in L.A. 2014,” its second biennial selection of contemporary artists working in Los Angeles. Organized by the museum’s chief curator, Connie Butler, along with independent curator...

  • Sanford ‘Sandy’ Frank: An appreciation

    April 23, 2014 | 11:43 am

    Sanford Jay Frank, the Emmy Award-winning writer and producer, screenwriting guru and conservative ideologue whom everyone called Sandy, died at his home in Calabasas on April 18 of complications arising out of a glioblastoma, a cancerous brain tumor. He was 59.

    Frank grew up in...

  • Pollock’s ‘Mural’: Masterpiece or macho outburst?

    April 2, 2014 | 2:02 pm

    Rarely do we see singular artworks that, even as they represent an exact moment of transition between art historical movements, are also masterpieces in their own right.  Yet that is exactly what can be seen now at the Getty Museum, which, until June 1, is showcasing abstract...

  • Ma’aleh teens find ‘strength’

    February 5, 2014 | 3:48 pm

    A black-and-white film shows a trial being called to session. In less than a second, it’s obvious this is the trial of Adolf Eichmann, in Jerusalem in April 1961, with Eichmann in the bulletproof glass booth. We watch as a witness takes the stand.

    We pull back now, in color, to a...

  • Bikel plays ‘Jewgrass’

    January 31, 2014 | 9:56 am

    Although I know it will disappoint some readers to learn that “A Jewgrass Revival,” at American Jewish University on Feb. 1, will not be a presentation of the latest Israeli hydroponic farming techniques for marijuana, I can say with confidence that this evening of Jewish Bluegrass...

  • We are all ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

    December 6, 2013 | 2:46 pm

    “Inside Llewyn Davis,” Joel and Ethan Coen’s new film, is the fictional story of one week in the life of a folksinger in Greenwich Village in 1961. The title character, played with total conviction by Oscar Isaac and supplied with credible material by the maven of American music,...

  • Danny Sanderson in L.A., celebrating 40 years of Israeli pop music

    December 4, 2013 | 2:01 pm

    If you’ve been to Israel in the last 40 years or heard Israeli popular music, then you probably know Danny Sanderson, who will be performing with his band at the Gindi Auditorium at American Jewish University on Dec. 8. Sanderson was a founding member in 1973 of Kaveret (literally...

  • The Wallis: Now that it’s built, will they come?

    November 27, 2013 | 10:33 am

    A giant risk is being taken with The Wallis — as the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hills is being called, and for which the 1934 Beverly Hills Post Office on Santa Monica Boulevard, between Canon and Crescent drives, has been rehabbed to pristine...

  • The price for Bob Dylan going electric

    November 25, 2013 | 5:01 pm

    The guitar stood on a stand in a small conference room in corporate offices in Beverly Hills. A black Fender Stratocaster with a white body plate, a few nicks to its side, it looked simple, basic, uncomplicated.

    Yet the story that brings this particular musical instrument to...

  • Lou Adler: The Midas touch

    November 13, 2013 | 12:37 pm

    About a mile north of Duke’s in Malibu, a right turn takes you up to a bluff with its own driveway, which leads to a large parking lot. There, on the day I visited, a tour bus was parked in front of a modest ranch house, alongside several other cars, none of them too fancy. The...

  • Israeli writer Etgar Keret on the long and (very) short of it

    October 30, 2013 | 1:23 pm

    Etgar Keret, with his collections “The Nimrod Flip-Out” and the recently published “Suddenly, a Knock on the Door,” reinvigorated the short story (and the short, short story). The author, whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, Zoetrope and on “This American Life,” recently...

  • Remembering Rabbi Berg

    October 9, 2013 | 1:26 pm

    The death on Sept. 16 of Rabbi Philip Berg, 86, who founded the Kabbalah Centre with his second wife, Karen, did not come as a surprise. Rav Berg, as he was known at the center, had suffered a stroke in 2004 and had been little heard of since. Yet his legacy remains significant: In...

  • The people’s architect: A retrospective displays Moshe Safdie’s global vision

    September 6, 2013 | 2:15 pm

    The Skirball Cultural Center, which stands at the crest of Sepulveda and Mulholland just west of the 405 Freeway, was built on a dump. Literally. Who knew? Before the Skirball acquired the land, it was a garbage dump. With its opening in 1996, architect Moshe Safdie, in his first...

  • Lusting for Leicas

    September 3, 2013 | 5:06 pm

    In one version of our lives, childhood is a series of deprivations and desires whereby we want things we can’t have, some of which we grow out of or just forget. In my case, I was seized with heartache when I entered the newly opened 8,000-square-foot Leica store on Beverly...

  • Hans Richter’s future is now!

    July 2, 2013 | 11:49 am

    The exhibition “Hans Richter: Encounters” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a curator’s dream:  retrospective of a somewhat obscure, multiplatform artist, who is equally adept (and revolutionary) in painting and film; whose life and career intersects with the major artists...

  • What is it with Israelis and high tech?

    June 19, 2013 | 11:14 am

    The Israel Conference held at the Luxe Hotel on Sunset Boulevard May 30-31 was the largest gathering I’ve ever seen of … Israelis in suits. 

    Beyond that, the two-day event was a persuasive showcase of Israeli innovation and how companies from all over the world — including...

  • South African Jews find a home in L.A.

    June 13, 2013 | 10:16 am

    How far can you travel in less than an hour? All the way to Capetown, South Africa, and back, if you are talking to Leora Raikin, a third-generation South African Jew who has lived in Los Angeles for the past 15 years. Raikin will speak about the Jews of South Africa on June 18 at...

  • Q&A with Israeli singer-songwriter Noa

    May 29, 2013 | 1:36 pm

    Achinoam Nini, the Israeli singer-songwriter known to all simply as Noa, will perform on June 18 at  American Jewish University as part of the new Geller Festival of the Arts. Born in Tel Aviv in 1969, Noa moved to New York as a child and lived there with her family until she...

  • Through the lens of Helmut Newton

    May 29, 2013 | 1:11 pm

    “Here They Come II, Paris,” from the series “Big Nudes,” 1981. © Estate of Helmut Newton

    Many years ago, on Jan. 23, 2004, to be precise, I was driving west on Sunset Boulevard when traffic stopped completely. There were police and an ambulance in front of the Chateau Marmont,...

  • Son of ‘Pacific Standard Time’

    May 15, 2013 | 11:31 am

    It’s back! 

    Remember long ago in those dark days of 2011, when “Pacific Standard Time,” the Getty-sponsored initiative, got more than 60 cultural organizations throughout Southern California to shine a light on the impact of Los Angeles’ art scene between 1945 and 1980? Well,...

  • Going home with Gary Baseman

    April 24, 2013 | 10:11 am

    There’s an old saying that goes something like this: We spend the first half of our lives running away from home and the rest trying to get back. Consider Homer, way back in ancient Greece, who defined our notion of a life’s odyssey as a journey that begins and ends at home.

    The...

  • From the ‘Heart’

    April 18, 2013 | 12:06 pm

    Sons of famous fathers rarely eclipse their parent. Although there are some notable exceptions (JFK and Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes come to mind), the singularity of purpose, the ruthlessness that lead to lasting renown, as well as the perks and vicissitudes that come with fame,...

  • New role for Moses

    March 22, 2013 | 10:55 am

    For Passover this year, Rizzoli has just released “The Bronfman Haggadah,” written by the businessman, philanthropist and Jewish community leader Edgar Bronfman Sr., illustrated by artist Jan Aronson, who is also Bronfman’s wife. Unlike other haggadot, this version includes the...

  • Michael Chabon’s search for authentic expression

    March 13, 2013 | 6:29 am

    A writer walks into a room full of rabbis. This sounds like the beginning of a joke, but it’s not. In the words of Woody Allen’s “Broadway Danny Rose,” “It’s the emes.” The Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR) held the Reform movement’s annual rabbinical convention March...

  • The future as seen at CES in Vegas

    February 13, 2013 | 2:16 pm

    When I was a young kid, my dad used to take me to the auto show at the old New York Coliseum, where together we looked, agog, at the cars of the future — experimental vehicles that would never see the light of day. I remember feeling bone-tired after walking the floor and being...

  • Arnold Schwartzman — master designer behind ‘Voices & Visions’

    December 21, 2012 | 10:26 am

    Arnold Schwartzman, the artistic director of the “Voices & Visions” program and one of the most accomplished designers and documentary directors of our times, is a story unto himself. Recently, I spent a few very companionable hours at Schwartzman’s L.A. home as he shared some of...

  • Harold Grinspoon: Visualizing Jewish ‘Voices’

    December 20, 2012 | 2:34 pm

    Here’s a challenge: Let’s say you had $1.1 million to give away on a program to inspire people working in Jewish organizations as well as the people who find themselves in their public spaces. 

    What would you do? Hand out baseball cards with the pictures of famous rabbis and...

  • The Winding Road to ‘Other Desert Cities’

    November 21, 2012 | 1:01 pm

    In Hollywood, the logline for this story would be: A playwright who has outwitted his demons to find balance in his life, has, after a devastating TV experience, returned to the stage with a play whose plot twist is as transformative to its actors, and to the audience’s assumptions...

  • See the far away before it’s gone away

    November 20, 2012 | 2:46 pm

    Last spring, I visited the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City and then, a month later, traveled to Chichen Itza, the 1,000-plus-year-old Mayan ruin. Both times I was struck by, on the one hand, the scientific, mathematical and engineering sophistication of the ancient...

  • The first Jewish president? Lincoln, in the Abrahamic tradition

    November 14, 2012 | 12:13 pm

    Abraham Lincoln has been dead for almost 150 years, yet suddenly he’s everywhere. At the Skirball Cultural Center, you can see an original copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Lincoln, amid an impressive array of founding American documents. The Huntington Library is...

  • A bed of roses

    October 26, 2012 | 1:55 pm

    In person, Larry Miller, president of Sit ’n Sleep, is less “Crazy Eddie” (fast-talking,  exuberant salesman) and more “Uncle Larry” (the gregarious, warmhearted, favorite family relative). When I went to visit him in his executive offices in Gardena, next to his...

  • Rita, on music and her roots [Q & A]

    October 24, 2012 | 2:38 pm

    On Nov. 1, Israel’s most popular and enduring pop icon, Rita Yahan-Farouz, known the world over simply as Rita, will appear at UCLA’s Royce Hall, along with a special band assembled for this tour. She will perform songs from throughout her career, in Hebrew, as well as songs from...

  • Lessons from Arthur Schnitzler’s Vienna

    September 27, 2012 | 3:31 pm

    One of my favorite New Yorker cartoons features two men in conversation walking down a city street. Surrounding them are dollar signs — in every window, on every car, on everything. The caption reads: “Remember when everything was sex, sex, sex?”

    This image came to mind the other...

  • What’s so great about Stanley Kubrick?

    September 11, 2012 | 10:59 am

    On Nov. 1, the Los Angeles County of Museum of Art, (LACMA) in partnership with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (those wonderful folks who bring us the Oscars), will present the first U.S. retrospective of filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, a project developed in...

  • Artist Channa Horwitz likes to break the rules

    August 22, 2012 | 3:40 pm

    Part of the pleasure of seeing a survey show of contemporary art, such as the summer show “Made in L.A. 2012,” currently at the Hammer Museum, lies in the joy of discovery. There may be artists whose works you recognize, but the WOW! of finding an artist you never knew existed...

  • Ongoing education at the click of a mouse

    August 8, 2012 | 4:12 pm

    It seems like only yesterday that my friend Teri was telling me that if she could do college all over again she would take different courses: literature, poetry and just a greater variety of subjects. Well, I’ve got some good news: turns out that you can now take an amazing variety...

  • The truth, beauty and desire

    July 11, 2012 | 12:22 pm

    Gustav Klimt is best known for his famous golden paintings, portraits of society women adorned in jewels and cloaked in gold, and for the flat two-dimensionality of his work that led many to declare it superficial and merely decorative. The Getty exhibition “Gustav Klimt: The Magic...

  • Capturing the music scene

    June 13, 2012 | 10:54 am

    The recent regional extravaganza known as Pacific Standard Time (PST), a six-month, far-ranging agglomeration of Southern California exhibitions, installations and performances, began with a series of shows that made a very convincing argument for the importance of art created in Los...

  • Culture with a side of popcorn

    April 11, 2012 | 11:45 am

    When the hit comedy “One Man, Two Guvnors” comes to Broadway this spring, I’ll be able to say I saw the London production. I also saw the Metropolitan Opera’s new production of “Don Giovanni” with the Polish tenor Mariusz Kwiecien. As for bragging rights, it’s hard to...

  • Jonathan Foer’s ‘New American Haggadah’:  Extremely unsurprising and incredibly similar

    March 29, 2012 | 4:46 pm

    The haggadah, the user’s manual to the Passover seder, might be the world’s oldest annually practiced ritual, and the story of the Jews’ freedom from slavery in Egypt is, Jonathan Safran Foer said recently, “the best-known greatest continuously read story” in book form. And...

  • Opinion: Demjanjuk’s just epitaph

    March 22, 2012 | 6:28 pm

    The recent death of John Demjanjuk, 91, in a nursing home in Germany, brings to a close one of the most extensive and most contested Nazi war crimes prosecutions in history, a process that began in the United States in the mid 1970s and was ongoing at the time of his death as...

  • He’s looked at clouds from both sides now…

    March 7, 2012 | 5:13 pm

    I listen to music all day, in my car, in my office, at the gym, while walking the dog or taking a hike. Most of what I listen to I don’t have to pay for; some of it I do. There are so many ways to discover new music or find old favorites that I thought it might be useful to create...

  • Art and fashion find their nexus in a Los Angeles creative couple

    February 1, 2012 | 3:04 pm

    Cubes of color intersected by bands, which the viewer can manipulate into arrangements within a grid framing the work; watercolors of narrow striations, punctuated by colors and shapes, transform abstraction from cool cerebral to emotional landscapes. Clothing made in Los Angeles but...

  • Through a lens, starkly

    November 23, 2011 | 12:22 pm

    “Pacific Standard Time,” the sprawling multivenue consideration of Los Angeles art from 1945 to 1980, is, for the most part, a story of artists who thrived here. However, “Naked Hollywood: Weegee in Los Angeles,” which opened Nov. 13 at MOCA Grand Avenue, posits a different...

  • Wallace Berman: The aleph male

    November 16, 2011 | 4:14 pm

    Art exhibitions take many forms. They can be surveys of a time, place, artist or artistic movement. They may reconsider an artist through a new prism, or appreciate the familiar in a new or different way. All too rare is the exhibition that invites the viewer to share in the joy of...

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